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Have brekky and a browse at Brisbane’s best Sunday markets

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Exiting Woodridge train station on a Sunday morning offers the dislocating feeling of having suddenly landed in the middle of a street market in Hong Kong, Bangkok or Phnom Penh.

The length of Croydon Road teems with stalls selling homegrown produce at recession-busting prices. There are colourful displays of familiar fruit and veg, but also less common products, such as tamarind, jackfruit, galangal, finger root and durian.

The diversity of humans here is equally vivid: African and Islander people, Thais and Cambodians, women in burqas, and elderly Sikh gentlemen in turbans.

Every Sunday, it’s here that you’ll find Dean Khieu, who has taken over running the Global Food Markets from his retired father, Paul.

Dean Khieu (right) now runs the Global Food Markets Logan started by his father, Paul.

Dean Khieu (right) now runs the Global Food Markets Logan started by his father, Paul.Credit: Global Food Markets Logan

“My dad had an Asian grocery store and he knew a lot of farmers. He started the market 17 years ago with the Logan City Council,” Khieu says.

In its infancy, the market was modest, with just a few stalls; now there’s more than 100, including a street food alley along Station Road, parallel to the train line.

“I love to come in the morning and eat pad thai, and skewers, and tom yum soup,” Khieu says.

Born in a refugee camp, Khieu arrived in Logan with his Cambodian parents in the early 1980s.

“In Cambodia, the Khmer Rouge executed intellectuals, so the refugees who made it here were farmers, and they brought that knowledge to Australia.”

“They come from all different places, but they all understand what it’s like to be a refugee, and they all support each other.”

Logan City has a long history of welcoming migrants, and the Global Food Markets have enabled many to have an income and find their feet.

The weekly market is one of Brisbane’s most vibrant, but it’s far from the only one. Here are some of the city’s best markets to explore on a Sunday.

Global Food Markets Logan

Good for: Fruit, veg and street food.

Every Sunday the Global Food Markets set up next to Woodridge Station with fresh produce from local growers.

Every Sunday the Global Food Markets set up next to Woodridge Station with fresh produce from local growers.Credit: Global Food Markets Logan

To wander up Croydon Road on a Sunday is to join a melting pot of Cambodian, Thai, Vietnamese, Chinese, Indonesian, Sudanese and Islander people selling fresh produce grown on properties and in backyards across the Logan region. You’ll see fruit and veg of the kind rarely seen at Coles and Woolies. Stock up then head to the street food section for a steaming bowl of noodles, freshly made roti, or some fried sweet Chinese breadsticks, washed down with a bubble tea.

Woodridge Station & Croydon Road, Logan Central.
Sunday 6am-12pm, free.

Northey Street Organic Farmers Markets

Good for: Organic food and sustainable lifestyle.

Northey Street Organic Farmers Markets is a haven for all things ethical and rustic.

Northey Street Organic Farmers Markets is a haven for all things ethical and rustic. Credit: Nick Dent

Taking place among the shady fig trees surrounding the nursery, these long-running markets are a focal point for everything organic, ethical, free-range and rustic. Shop for organic fruit and veges, organic meats and smallgoods; get a fair trade locally roasted coffee; sign an anti-fracking petition; and get a shiatsu massage. Street eats are the likes of Japanese tofu skewers and gluten-free pancakes. Buskers add to the carnival atmosphere, and there are craft tables and swings for the kids. Despite being mere metres from Herston’s concrete tangle of bridges, tunnels and freeways, the market could be in Mullumbimby.

Northey Street City Farm, 54 Northey Street, Windsor.
Sunday 6-11am, free.

Milton Markets

Good for: Crystals and sourdough.

Milton Markets is strong on bakery products, fruit and veg, crystals and jewellery.

Milton Markets is strong on bakery products, fruit and veg, crystals and jewellery.Credit: Milton Markets

These bustling weekly markets – a stone’s throw from Lang Park – cram a lot of goodness into a smallish space. Get a life-changing loaf from bakery stalls such as Artisan Bread Box or Leavain Organic Sourdough; fill your larder with outlandish-looking fungi from No Mushroom No Life; or sample freeze-dried lollies from Mrs Frost. Lovers of crystals can find plenty of polished rocks and jewellery, and the street food offerings include arepas, Korean skewers, poffertjes and foot-long German sausages. The multi-level car park next door only charges $2 on Sundays but fills up quickly – best get up early for this one.

Milton Green, Cribb Street, Milton.
Sunday 6am-12pm (7am-1pm winter). Free.

Mount Gravatt Markets

Good for: Trash ′n’ treasure.

Mt Gravatt Markets offers fresh produce as well as trash and treasure.

Mt Gravatt Markets offers fresh produce as well as trash and treasure.Credit: Mt Gravatt Markets

Taking place at Mount Gravatt Showgrounds, the markets have about 200 stalls offering fresh produce from local growers, meats and deli products, honey, flowers and plants, a tasty range of street nibbles, and the thrill of the hunt in the trash and treasure market. If you’re looking for something else to do afterwards, the Mount Gravatt Mini Golf and Foot Golf course is right next door.

1644 Logan Road, Mt Gravatt (enter via Broadwater Road).
Sunday 6am-noon, $2 (under 16 free).

Nundah Farmers Markets

Good for: Brekky in a village atmosphere.

Nundah Farmers Markets takes place next to Nundah train station.

Nundah Farmers Markets takes place next to Nundah train station.Credit: Nundah Farmers Markets

One of life’s great pleasures is to get up early, get a barista coffee and a breakfast roll at an open-air market, and catch up with friends for a chinwag and a browse. Nundah Village has a great little market hugging the train station that is perfect for just that. The formula here is simple: a few greengrocers and plant sellers, a fishmonger and some artisan butchers, some street eats like momos, banh mi and poffertjes, and a couple of pop-up cafes with plenty of seating. Pick up dulce de leche biscuits from Magia by Coky, chilli jam from the Chilli Love Co, or a sumptuous toastie from Cordelia Sourdough Bakehouse.

Station Street, Nundah.
Sunday 6am-12pm, free.

Manly Creative Markets

Good for: Designers and makers.

Manly Creative Markets specialises in artisan wares.

Manly Creative Markets specialises in artisan wares.Credit: Greg Sullavan – Sunburst Studios

The Manly waterfront is the pleasant location of these fun weekly markets, which focus on the works of creative entrepreneurs. Don’t go along expecting much in the way of second-hand clothes or used knick-knacks, it’s all about unique handmade products, or those with a twist. Packaged foods such as honey are available, plus some baked treats, but beverages are usually limited to coffee. For the kids, there is often a petting zoo and a bouncy castle.

Little Bayside Park, Manly.
Sunday 8am-2pm, free.

HOTA Farmers & Artisan Markets

Good for: Markets by the lake.

The markets at Home of the Arts in Surfers Paradise are next to Evandale Lake.

The markets at Home of the Arts in Surfers Paradise are next to Evandale Lake.Credit: HOTA

Never mind beaches – the Home of the Arts alone is worth the journey to Surfers Paradise for an amazing art gallery and, every Sunday, produce and designer markets. Expect seasonal fresh produce, artisan foods to nibble, meats and fresh fish, locally roasted coffees, juices, handcrafted fashion, and live music. There are shaded areas for sitting and eating your pastries, oysters or noodles, and in warm weather, you can take a dip in the famous Evandale Lake.

HOTA, 135 Bundall Road, Surfers Paradise.
Sunday 6-11.30am, free.

Riverside at the Gardens Markets

Good for: Jewellery, clothing and a walk in the park.

The markets at City Botanic Gardens have been going in some form or other for more than 30 years.

The markets at City Botanic Gardens have been going in some form or other for more than 30 years.Credit: Riverside at the Gardens Markets

The old faithful of Brisbane markets has been going in one form or another since the 1980s. Formerly located along the river, the markets now occupy the main entrance boulevard to the City Botanic Gardens. While skyscrapers and palm trees loom overhead, pick up some flares or a 1990s T-shirt from Postmodern Pirate Clothing, an opal ring from Earthly Magic Studio, or some fun plastic earrings from Sunshine Tonic. Brunch offerings include Cuban sandwiches, Brazilian burgers, spicy pad krapow, steamed dim sum, and pho, or simply refresh yourself on a whole coconut from Cocoart.

Brisbane City Botanic Gardens, Corner of Alice & Albert streets, Brisbane.
Sunday 8am-3pm, free.

Northshore Produce Market

Good for: Live music, fruit and veg.

Northshore Produce Market is Brisbane’s newest Sunday market.

Northshore Produce Market is Brisbane’s newest Sunday market.Credit: Nick Dent

Launched just this month, this farmers’ market takes place among the jetties, buoys and shipping containers of Maritime Green at Northshore. Get your veggie ration from Sandy Green Organic Produce, some grass-fed pork from Lazy Cow Farms, a piece of honeycomb from Teralba Park Honey, or an alpaca poncho from Tintola Trading. Snacks include Ruby’s Gourmet Sausage Rolls, and OMG Donuts, with unusual flavour profiles such as beetroot or Yarra Valley strawberries.

Maritime Green, Northshore, 147 MacArthur Ave, Hamilton.
Sunday 7am-1pm, free.

Did we get it right? Did we forget something? Let us know at nick.dent@nine.com.au.

Looking for something else to do with the kids? Check out Brisbane’s spectacular free playgrounds.

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